NARRATIVE REVIEW/POSITION PAPERS ON COGNITIVE AGING

  • Verhaeghen, P. (2000). The interplay of growth and decline: Theoretical and empirical aspects of plasticity of intellectual and memory performance in normal old age. In R. D. Hill, L. Bäckman, and A. Stigsdotter Neely (Eds.), Cognitive rehabilitation in old age (pp. 3-22). New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Verhaeghen, P. (2000). The parallels in beauty’s brow: Time-accuracy functions and their implications for cognitive aging theories. In T. J. Perfect and E. A. Maylor (Eds.), Models of cognitive aging (pp. 50-86). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Verhaeghen, P. (2004). Framing fearful (a)symmetries: Three hard questions about cognitive aging. In R. A. Dixon, L. Bäckman and L-G Nilsson (Eds.), New Frontiers in Cognitive Aging (p. 309-329). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Verhaeghen, P., Cerella, J., Bopp, K. L., & Basak, C. (2005). Aging and varieties of cognitive control: A review of meta-analyses on resistance to interference, coordination and task switching, and an experimental exploration of age-sensitivity in the newly identified process of focus switching. In R. W. Engle, G. Sedek, U. von Hecker, & D. N. McIntosh (Eds.), Cognitive Limitations in Aging and Psychopathology: Attention, Working Memory, and Executive Functions (pp.160-189). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.
  • Hoyer, W. J., & Verhaeghen, P. (2006). Memory aging. In J. E. Birren and K. W. Schaie (Eds.), Handbook of the psychology of aging (sixth edition, pp. 209-232). San Diego: Elsevier.
  • Verhaeghen, P. (2006). Reaction time. In R. Schulz, L. Noelker, K. Rockwood, R. Sprott (Eds.), The Encyclopedia of Aging, 4th edition, New York: Springer Publishing Company.

WORKING MEMORY/EXECUTIVE CONTROL PAPERS

(Note some overlap with the cognitive aging articles.)

PEER-REVIEWED ARTICLES:
  • Verhaeghen, P. (2002). Age differences in efficiency and effectiveness of encoding for visual search and memory search: A time-accuracy study. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 9, 114-126.
  • Verhaeghen, P., Cerella, J, & Basak, C. (2004). A working memory workout: How to change to size of the focus of attention from one to four in ten hours or less. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 30, 1322-1337.
  • Verhaeghen, P., & Basak, C. (2005). Aging and switching of the focus of attention in working memory: Results from a modified N-Back task. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (A), 58, 134-154.
  • Verhaeghen, P., Cerella, J, & Basak, C. (2006). Aging, task complexity, and efficiency modes: The influence of working memory involvement on age differences in response times for verbal and visuospatial tasks. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 13, 254-280.
  • Verhaeghen, P., & Hoyer, W. J. (2007). Aging, focus switching and task switching in a continuous calculation task: Evidence toward a new working memory control process. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 14, 22-39.
  • Bopp, K. L., & Verhaeghen, P. (2007). Age-related differences in executive control processes in verbal and visuo-spatial working memory: Storage, transformation, supervision, and coordination. Journals of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, 62, 239-246.
  • Vaughan, L., Basak, C., Hartman, M. & Verhaeghen, P. (in press). Aging and working memory inside and outside the focus of attention: Dissociations of availability and accessibility. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition.
  • Lange, E. B., & Verhaeghen, P. (in press). No age differences in complex memory search: Older adults search as efficiently as younger adults. Psychology and Aging.
BOOK CHAPTERS:
  • Verhaeghen, P., Cerella, J., Bopp, K. L., & Basak, C. (2005). Aging and varieties of cognitive control: A review of meta-analyses on resistance to interference, coordination and task switching, and an experimental exploration of age-sensitivity in the newly identified process of focus switching. In R. W. Engle, G. Sedek, U. von Hecker, & D. N. McIntosh (Eds.), Cognitive Limitations in Aging and Psychopathology: Attention, Working Memory, and Executive Functions (pp.160-189). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.
  • Verhaeghen, P., Cerella, J., Basak, C., Bopp, K. L., Zhang, Y., & Hoyer, W. J. (2007). The ins and outs of working memory: Dynamic processes associated with focus switching and search. Osaka, N., Logie, R. & D’Esposito, M. (eds.). Working Memory: Behavioural & Neural Correlates (pp. 81-98), Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
'POPULAR' PRESS ABOUT US:
  • The APA Monitor about the VBC working memory work-out paper.

PRIMARY STUDIES OF COGNITIVE AGING

By 'primary' I mean papers that contain my own research, as opposed to meta-analyses or review papers.

  • Verhaeghen, P., Van Ranst, N., & Marcoen, A. (1993). Memory training in the community: Evaluations by participants and effects on metamemory. Educational Gerontology, 19, 523-532.
  • Verhaeghen, P., & Marcoen, A. (1993). Memory aging as a general phenomenon: Episodic recall of older adults is a function of episodic recall of the young. Psychology and Aging, 8, 380-388.
  • Verhaeghen, P., & Marcoen, A. (1993). More or less the same? A memorability analysis on episodic memory tasks in young and older adults. Journals of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, 48, P172-P178.
  • Verhaeghen, P., & Marcoen, A. (1994). The production deficiency hypothesis revisited: Adult age differences in strategy use as a function of processing resources. Aging and Cognition, 1, 323-338.
  • Verhaeghen, P., & Marcoen, A. (1996). On the mechanisms of plasticity in young and older adults after instruction in the method of loci: Evidence for an amplification model. Psychology and Aging, 11, 164-178.
  • Verhaeghen, P., Kliegl, R., & Mayr, U. (1997). Sequential and coordinative complexity in time-accuracy function for mental arithmetic. Psychology and Aging, 12, 555-564.
  • Verhaeghen, P., Vandenbroucke, A., & Dierckx, V. (1998). Growing slower and less accurate: The effects of age on time-accuracy functions for recall from episodic memory. Experimental Aging Research, 24, 3-19.
  • Verhaeghen, P. (1999). The effects of age-related slowing and working memory on asymptotic recognition performance. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 6, 201-213.
  • Verhaeghen, P., Geraerts, N., & Marcoen, A. (2000). Memory complaints, coping, and well-being in old age: A systemic approach. The Gerontologist, 40, 540-548.
  • Verhaeghen, P., & Kliegl, R. (2000). The effects of learning a new algorithm on asymptotic accuracy and execution speed in old age: A reanalysis. Psychology and Aging, 15, 648-656.
  • Verhaeghen, P., Palfai, T., Cerella, J., Buchler, N., Johnson, M. P., D'Eredita, M., Green, D. R., Hoyer, W. J., & Makekau, M. (2000). Age-related dissociations in time-accuracy functions for recognition memory: Utilizing semantic support versus building new representations. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 7, 260-272.
  • Verhaeghen, P. (2002). Age differences in efficiency and effectiveness of encoding for visual search and memory search: A time-accuracy study. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 9, 114-126.
  • Verhaeghen, P., Cerella, J., Semenec, S. C.; Leo, M. E., Bopp, K. L., &. Steitz, D. W. (2002). Cognitive efficiency modes in old age: Performance on sequential and coordinative verbal and visuo-spatial tasks. Psychology and Aging, 17, 558-570.
  • Basak, C., & Verhaeghen, P. (2003). Subitizing speed, subitizing range, counting speed, the Stroop effect, and aging: Capacity differences, speed equivalence. Psychology and Aging, 18, 240-249.
  • Singer, T., Verhaeghen, P., Ghisletta, P., Lindenberger, U., & Baltes, P. B. (2003). The fate of cognition in very old age: Six-year longitudinal findings in the Berlin Aging Study (BASE). Psychology and Aging, 18, 318-331.
  • Verhaeghen, P., Borchelt, M., & Smith, J. (2003). The relation between cardiovascular and metabolic disease and cognition in very old age: Cross-sectional and longitudinal findings from the Berlin Aging Study. Health Psychology, 22, 559–569.
  • Verhaeghen, P., & Basak, C. (2005). Aging and switching of the focus of attention in working memory: Results from a modified N-Back task. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (A), 58, 134-154.
  • Verhaeghen, P., Cerella, J, & Basak, C. (2006). Aging, task complexity, and efficiency modes: The influence of working memory involvement on age differences in response times for verbal and visuospatial tasks. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 13, 254-280.
  • Verhaeghen, P., & Hoyer, W. J. (2007). Aging, focus switching and task switching in a continuous calculation task: Evidence toward a new working memory control process. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 14, 22-39.
  • Bopp, K. L., & Verhaeghen, P. (2007). Age-related differences in executive control processes in verbal and visuo-spatial working memory: Storage, transformation, supervision, and coordination. Journals of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, 62, 239-246.
  • Zhang, Y., Han, B., Verhaeghen, P., & Nilsson, L-G. (2007). Executive functioning in older adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment: MCI has effects on planning, but not on inhibition. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 14, 557-570.
  • Vaughan, L., Basak, C., Hartman, M. & Verhaeghen, P. (in press). Aging and working memory inside and outside the focus of attention: Dissociations of availability and accessibility. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition.
  • Lange, E. B., & Verhaeghen, P. (in press). No age differences in complex memory search: Older adults search as efficiently as younger adults. Psychology and Aging.

META-ANALYSES OF COGNITIVE AGING

Meta-analysis basically refers to gathering a large amount of data from multiple sources (typcially published articles) and pooling them to answer your research questions. I tend to think of them as having low signal/noise ratios, meaning that I tend to trust results flagged as statistically significant in a meta, but that different sources of noise (measurement variance, sampling error) might obscure 'true' effects. They're conservative tools. What I do like about them is that you can ask really big questions, and answer them on nonsuspect samples, that is, the questions asked in a meta is often not what the original study was focused on.

PEER-REVIEWED ARTICLES
BOOK CHAPTERS:
  • Verhaeghen, P. (2000). The interplay of growth and decline: Theoretical and empirical aspects of plasticity of intellectual and memory performance in normal old age. In R. D. Hill, L. Bäckman, and A. Stigsdotter Neely (Eds.), Cognitive rehabilitation in old age (pp. 3-22). New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Verhaeghen, P. (2000). The parallels in beauty’s brow: Time-accuracy functions and their implications for cognitive aging theories. In T. J. Perfect and E. A. Maylor (Eds.), Models of cognitive aging (pp. 50-86). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Verhaeghen, P., & Cerella, J. (2008). Everything we know about aging and response times: A meta-analytic integration. Hofer, S. M., & Alwin, D. F. (Eds.). The Handbook of Cognitive Aging: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (pp. 134-150). Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

CREATIVITY

Verhaeghen, P., Joormann, J. & Kahn, R. (2005). Why we sing the blues: The relation between self-reflective rumination, mood, and creativity. Emotion, 5, 226-232.

The APA Monitor referenced this study.

MISCELLENIA